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The Hamptons Fine Art Fair I July 14th – July 17th

The Hamptons Fine Art Fair I July 14th – July 17th

Article written by Caroline Haller

 

The Hamptons Fine Art Fair ran July 14th – July 17th! Over 90 galleries were present. Alessandro Berni Gallery represented eight fantastic artists at the Hamptons Fine Art Fair. These artists were: Karmin Schafer-Hansen, Lauralee Franco, Hera Kim, Mary Mattingly, Wo Schiffman, Marco Domeniconi, Nonos, and John Denis.

Alessandro Berni Gallery’s booth, 302, was a carefully curated exhibition, where unique mediums and styles combined to create a fantastic booth layout. As viewers turned the corner approaching Alessandro Berni Gallery’s booth, John Denis’s tall waves of fused glass caught their eyes. The right corner of the booth felt like a dive under water. With John Denis’s clear, blue and metallic fused glass sculptures feeding directly into a metallic circle called “Traces in the Sand” made of carbon, resin and pigments by Nonos. Nonos is an artistic duo formed by sisters Franziska and Mercedes Welte. Wo Schiffman’s “Edge of Night” completed the ocean-like corner with a triptych of deep blue oils on canvas. Wo Schiffman also showed the triptych “Desert: Water Dreams.”

 

 

Many viewers stopped to see “Aleppo” from Marco Domeniconi’s drip series. Marco Domeniconi showed three works from two separate series. The furthest left, “Ocean Park,” appealed to local visitors because it represented a view of a local beach called Peter’s Pond. Domeniconi’s drip series was created after he visited refugee camps and decided to create works inspired by the locations those refugees came from. Though Aleppo’s bright reds and blues often drew in the visitors they also enjoyed “Khan Shaykhum,” with its darker colors subduing the bottom layers of bright red.

 

 

Catching viewers eyes as the passed between the two sections of the booth was local artist Mary Mattingly’s funky sculpture “Please Forgive Me.” The bright yellow symbol person, as Mattingly calls it, functions as a bench and the steel is formed to look like a person bowing to ask for forgiveness. Mattingly’s other sculpture “Head Over Heels” was often joked about as viewers laughed about the prospect of getting into that position!

When the two steel sculptures grabbed their attention, viewers moved closer hovering over Mattingly’s two wall pieces, trying to figure out just what they were made of. “Physeter Macroephalus” and “Three Swipes” both featured photographed graffiti printed on aluminum with laser cut shapes and symbols and LED accents.

 

 

From the other direction, Karmin Schafer Hansen’s large wood sculptures caught everyone’s eye. With Karmin’s work, viewers were also drawn in as they attempted to discover what material they were. Upon learning that they were wood, their mouths dropped open. Karmin was inspired by watching carver Glen Lucas deposit spirals on the floor after carving bowls. The “lost” spirals were then “found” by Karmin. The idea evolved into her “Lost and Found” series where she spirals dyed wood and glues it to shapes to create monumental sculptures out of the colorful spirals.

Catching viewers eyes as the passed between the two sections of the booth was local artist Mary Mattingly’s funky sculpture “Please Forgive Me.” The bright yellow symbol person, as Mattingly calls it, functions as a bench and the steel is formed to look like a person bowing to ask for forgiveness. Mattingly’s other sculpture “Head Over Heels” was often joked about as viewers laughed about the prospect of getting into that position!

When the two steel sculptures grabbed their attention, viewers moved closer hovering over Mattingly’s two wall pieces, trying to figure out just what they were made of. “Physeter Macroephalus” and “Three Swipes” both featured photographed graffiti printed on aluminum with laser cut shapes and symbols and LED accents.

 

 

Many viewers were stunned and taken aback by the sheer size of Lauralee Franco’s middle canvas “A Lady and Her Arrows.” Admirers of Abstract Expressionism typically stopped, but they discovered something unique in the central canvas and the flanking canvases “The Heart of the Claddagh” and “One’s Own Hook.” Though, Franco’s work is typically categorized as Abstract Expressionism, it differs in many ways from the traditionally masculine dominated field. Her broad strokes soften at the edges and her bright color palate introduces a livelier vein to the discipline. The closer one looks the more there is to find within Franco’s three canvases. Feminine profiles, arrows, hooks, and a claddagh ring symbolize her Irish heritage and her desire to enable women to chart their own destiny.

 

 

 

Lastly, Hera Kim’s pieces always garner interest. There is something familiar about Hera Kim’s work. When they see the pieces out of the corner of their eye, the viewers hearts skip a beat. Feeling as if they have discovered a hidden gem, viewers stop to admire the meticulous detail involved in Kim’s work. Starting with a grid, Kim layers geometric shapes, symbols and colors until the cubist style figure reveals itself in paint. Kim showed “Woman Playing Guitar,” “Woman Sitting on a Chair” “Blue Horse” and “Bird and Time,” rotating the works daily to show off her pieces in the space.

 

 

 

If you missed the Hampton’s Fine Art Fair, check out Alessandro Berni Gallery’s virtual booth with all of the pieces here!

Alessandro Berni Gallery will return to The Hamptons at the Art Market Hamptons from August 11- 14th. Be sure to check out the booth then!

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