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Inside Hera Kim’s studio

Inside Hera Kim’s studio

Article by Caroline Haller

 

 

 

Born in Seoul, Korea, Hera Kim maintains a studio in Northern Virginia. Although she initially studied Bio and Brain Engineering at KAIST, when she moved to America in 2010, she began to study fine art at Maryland Institute College of Art. She graduated in 2014.

Kim uses the daily painting as a therapy process. She finds calm and peace in the linework and brushstrokes. However, she is not sure if painting provides a positive healing or a negative distortion of life. Kim’s unique proto-cubist style is developed by combining an influence from famed artists Hilma af Klint, Francis Bacon, Pablo Picasso and Fernando Botero with a painstaking process.

Recently, Kim has exhibited at Clio Art Fair in 2020 and 2021 and the Hamptons Fine Art Fair in 2022. Furthermore, her work has been shown at Context Art Miami both in 2021 and again this year in 2022. This year at Context Miami from November 30 to December 4th Kim was represented by Alessandro Berni Gallery.

At fairs like Context, viewers love Kim’s work because they recognize something familiar in it. The playful, colorful and fun figures are a contemporary spin on a distinct cubist style. To create her works like Jogger (Pink), Jogger (Purple), Rooster, and TyRex, Kim starts with a grid then layers geometric shapes, symbols and colors until the cubist style figure reveals itself in paint.

 

 

The available works exhibited at Context Miami can be purchased here through December 30th.

Alessandro Berni Gallery at CONTEXT Art Miami 2022 | Artsy

I wanted to learn more about how Kim sees her own work! So, I asked her a few questions which you can read below. Follow Kim on Instagram @herakim.gallery to keep up with her works.

 

 

 

Where does your inspiration come from?

Failure

 

Your painting process includes a painstakingly created grid, correct? Can you discuss your painting process? 

I use the grids to break a blank canvas. I start painting by creating the grids and finish the painting bringing the grids back to front. 

 

Can you talk about what painting means to you? 

 Life regulator 

 Life controller 

  

What are some of the symbols present in Blue Horse, 2022? 

Time blocks: I store my time and emotions in small and large geometric shapes. I can say that they are personal symbols presenting my memory. 

 

What does your studio space/ working space look like?

Since the pandemic began, I’ve worked at home. I share my space with my cats and dogs.

 

 

 

What has your experience been exhibiting your work at shows like Clio Art Fair, Context Art Miami and Hamptons Fine Art Fair?

It allows me to meet new people.

 

What does a day in your life look like when you aren’t working on your art?

Sleep

 

Let’s end on a fun note; If you had to choose, would you pick Red, Yellow, Blue, or Green?

Blue

 

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